Courtyards invite us outside in the warmer months but provide little protection from the sun.

For this exposed courtyard, a solid 6 x 2.4m timber pergola was built as a framework for climbing plants to shade the area, and supported by a ledger secured with Dynabolts to the rendered side wall of the house.

Before starting the build, ensure timber sizes meet national standards and check whether council approval or building plans are required.

We used Woodhouse Weatherproof Pink Primed LOSP Architectural Pine.

Treated to an H3 level to be termite and fungal resistant, it needs finishing with two coats of paint. The posts and beams are GL8 laminated pine, while the rafters, ledger, battens and braces were cut from structural F7 pine.

Step 4. Cut beam housings

Step 4. Cut beam housings
Handyman Magazine

Set out the beam housings on the end posts, measuring 60mm down and 42mm up from the rafter positions, then cut the top of the end posts to align with the top of the rafters at 5º. Use a circular saw to cut away the housing waste, finishing with a chisel. Seal the cut ends of the timber.

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Step 5. Erect posts

Step 5. Erect posts
Handyman Magazine

Stand the two end posts and secure to the concrete footings using Dynabolts.

Brace them plumb and stretch a stringline between the end posts to locate the housing position on the centre post.

Cut the centre post to length, prepare the beam housing, then brace and bolt it in position.

Step 6. Secure front beam

Step 6. Secure front beam
Handyman Magazine

Cut 65 x 30mm rebates on the beam ends, chiselling out the waste, then lift it into position on the posts.

Drill offset 25mm recesses to 20mm deep in the back of each post, then finish drilling through with a 10mm auger bit.

Tap in the bolts and secure the beam using a socket wrench.

Courtyards invite us outside in the warmer months but provide little protection from the sun.

For this exposed courtyard, a solid 6 x 2.4m timber pergola was built as a framework for climbing plants to shade the area, and supported by a ledger secured with Dynabolts to the rendered side wall of the house.

Before starting the build, ensure timber sizes meet national standards and check whether council approval or building plans are required.

We used Woodhouse Weatherproof Pink Primed LOSP Architectural Pine.

Treated to an H3 level to be termite and fungal resistant, it needs finishing with two coats of paint. The posts and beams are GL8 laminated pine, while the rafters, ledger, battens and braces were cut from structural F7 pine.

Step 7. Add the rafters

Step 7. Add the rafters
Handyman Magazine

Cut the rafters with 5º parallel bevels on each end. Use screws to temporarily secure cleats to the beam and ledger, then position each rafter in turn on the setout marks, securing with pairs of skewed nails on either side, then with 140 x 45mm joist hangers and clouts.

Step 8. Attach side beams

Step 8. Attach side beams
Handyman Magazine

Cut the side beams to length with 5º parallel bevels on each end, then clamp them to the end rafters and secure to the front beam using screws. Secure the side beams to the end rafters from the inside with screws at 500mm centres, then secure the side beams to the ledger with screws.

Step 9. Secure battens

Step 9. Secure battens
Handyman Magazine

Position the first batten on the rafters next to the front beam, then cut spacers to position the remaining battens. Drill 8mm clearance holes in the battens to secure to the rafters with screws. Countersink the screw heads just below the surface, cover with timber filler and sand when dry.

Courtyards invite us outside in the warmer months but provide little protection from the sun.

For this exposed courtyard, a solid 6 x 2.4m timber pergola was built as a framework for climbing plants to shade the area, and supported by a ledger secured with Dynabolts to the rendered side wall of the house.

Before starting the build, ensure timber sizes meet national standards and check whether council approval or building plans are required.

We used Woodhouse Weatherproof Pink Primed LOSP Architectural Pine.

Treated to an H3 level to be termite and fungal resistant, it needs finishing with two coats of paint. The posts and beams are GL8 laminated pine, while the rafters, ledger, battens and braces were cut from structural F7 pine.

Post setout

Post setout
Handyman Magazine

Follow each element of the post setout, measurements are in mm.

Rafter setout

Rafter setout
Handyman Magazine

Follow each element of the rafter setout, measurements in mm.

Cutting list

Cutting list
Handyman Magazine

Follow our cutting list to see what materials you need for this project, and in what size.

Courtyards invite us outside in the warmer months but provide little protection from the sun.

For this exposed courtyard, a solid 6 x 2.4m timber pergola was built as a framework for climbing plants to shade the area, and supported by a ledger secured with Dynabolts to the rendered side wall of the house.

Before starting the build, ensure timber sizes meet national standards and check whether council approval or building plans are required.

We used Woodhouse Weatherproof Pink Primed LOSP Architectural Pine.

Treated to an H3 level to be termite and fungal resistant, it needs finishing with two coats of paint. The posts and beams are GL8 laminated pine, while the rafters, ledger, battens and braces were cut from structural F7 pine.

Fastner list

Fastner list

Follow the fastener list to see what fasteners you need for this project and in what sizes.